I'll admit that I'm messing with more than a few laws of physics to write this review, but physics be dammed the word must spread.

In the year 2034, Scott Lynch exited hyperbolic stasis and finished writing "The Thorn of Emberlain". Giving the series a meaningful concussion and bringing back many of the series fancier characters. Lynch continues to write interesting and snappy dialogue, particularly for Jean who's story is the central point of the final book as he and the reader watch Locke stumble further and further into his own ambition, paranoia, and madness.

I won't spoil any particulars of the book, but plot twists abound early and often as we're kept on the edge or seats.

All in all, I feel the pacing could have been written better, jumping between the future and the present is an interesting new twist on the flashback style Lynch has cultivated.

However, an uneventful villain and story elements that often feel like they come out of left field prevent the story from achieving the same degree of integrity of the previous novels.

However, it's still provided an enjoyable if not time dilated read for the very few fans that Lynch will have left after the 2028 election apocalypse.

With 50,000 copies sold of The Republic of Thieves and with praise from the likes of Joe Abercrombie and George RR Martin the saga of the Gentleman Bastard has become a favorite and key part of the fantasy landscape. And now Locke Lamora, thief, con-man, pirate, political deceiver must become a soldier.
A new chapter for Locke and Jean and finally the war that has been brewing in the Kingdom of the Marrows flares up and threatens to capture all in its flames.
And all the while Locke must try to deal with the disturbing rumors about his past revealed in The Republic of Thieves. Fighting a war when you don't know the truth of right and wrong is one thing. Fighting a war when you don't know the truth of yourself is quite another. Particularly when you've never been that good with a sword anyway...